hello and welcome in this video I’m going to show you the initial setup of the Raspberry Pi when you first boot the Raspberry Pi it’s going to run through a setup routine and I’m going to show you what that looks like and I’m also going to demonstrate to you how to configure a wireless a wireless connection let me first show you what I’ve got here here’s the Raspberry Pi let’s see if it there you can see that a little bit better so let me explain what I’ve got going on here first of all this is connected to my computer monitor I’ve got an HDMI to DVI adapter the DVI cable goes to my monitor now keep in mind that if you plug this into an HDMI TV you might be able to just plug that in this one is in fact going to my monitor over here I’ve got a wireless keyboard and mouse now if the wireless keyboard and mouse is on the Raspberry Pi compatibility list this won’t need any configuring it’ll be immediately recognized the wireless connection however this is a little wireless dongle I’ve got plugged in here this will need some configuration now if you don’t want to go wireless here you could just connect an Internet Ethernet cable cat5 cat5e cat6 and connect that directly to your home router and that would probably start right up I’ve also got the card inserted remember the card has to be prepared I’ve showed you that in a previous video so make sure you’ve prepared the card put the operating system on it another way is very PI doesn’t have an on/off switch so in order to turn it on all you’re going to do is take your power connection I’m using a cell phone charger here but there are a couple of other options I’ve covered those in previous videos and to turn it on all I’m going to do is plug it in you can see the light start to go perhaps and then in a second you’ll see the you’ll see the screen boot up let me go ahead and kill some of the reflection here so you can see that a little bit better and you can see the Raspberry Pi beginning its boot procedure here and it takes a few seconds and the first time and the first time only you’re going to come to this configuration program now you can come back to this later and run it if you need to change something the first time it loads automatically so let me orient you here you’re going to arrow up and down on the keyboard to get to a selection and then you’re going to use your tab key to go to selector to finish like this and tab back to the selections so there’s a couple of selections you need to make when you first start the system one is this selection here expand route FS that expands the route partition to fill the SD card and let me zoom in a little bit so you can see this perhaps a little bit better it makes it a little bit bigger for you to see so expand the root filesystem when you initially format the card it writes just a little bit of the card with the operating system but you actually want to make the whole card available because you’re going to use that for your storage as well so you want to expand the root filesystem so again arrow up and down you know until that option is highlighted once that option is highlighted press the tab key then you can press ENTER to select it it’s going to go out and write some stuff come back and set it’s been resized and you can press the Enter key again to say okay that will bring you back to the configuration screen the other thing you might want to do right now is to make sure that the SSH server is started ssh stands for secure shell this is a means by which you can communicate with the Raspberry Pi remotely so that if it’s on you can actually log into the Raspberry Pi from a remote computer say another computer or a laptop on your network and to do that you want to make sure that SSH is enabled I’ll cover how that works in a future video but for right now let’s make sure it’s on so get SSH highlighted there press the tab key to select that press ENTER after it’s selected would you like the ssh server enabled or disabled you want to select enable you can toggle back and forth there if it’s not so select an able and press Enter again it will write some stuff out and come back and now the SSH server is enabled and you can press ENTER to go back to the configuration screen a couple of other things you can do here if you want to do them now you can you

can configure overscan that’s a video option that you probably will not need but if it turns out your picture isn’t sized quite right you might need to come back here and change the over skin if you have an alternate keyboard you can come back and set the keyboard you can change the password you can set a locale or timezone you can change the memory split I probably wouldn’t recommend you do that unless you have a really good reason the Raspberry Pi supports overclocking so if you configure this you can actually make the Raspberry Pi run a little bit faster than it does standard you can configure the desktop to start on boot I’m going to show you the desktop in just a minute and then you can do an update there’s an alternative to doing the update I’m going to show you that so the two things you really want to do for sure the first time you run this or expand the root filesystem enable or disable SSH server and then when you’re done with that press the tab key to select press it again to select finish then go ahead and press Enter it’s going to reboot would you like to reboot now yes answer yes and now we’re going to go through the boot process again again it’ll take a few seconds so we’ll wait till that process finishes rebooting and the autofocus appears to be kicking in but that’ll stabilize in just a second I’m going to pull back out here so you can see what the screen looks like now we come to a login prompt I’m going to tilt this down to make sure that you can see it and it’s going to want a username and a password the login username by default is PI is in Raspberry Pi so that’s P I so you’ll enter PI the default password is raspberry all small case and case does count so enter that and make sure you spell it right and note that the password does not echo as you type it so just go ahead and type it and press Enter and if you’ve typed it right with no typos you come to the standard Linux prompt we’re now at the command line and if you were just going to run this as a server you could go ahead and do whatever server like things you wanted to run on it now we do need to configure the wireless that I talked about and so I’m going to show you how to do that it’s possible to do that by configuring various files at the command prompt here but if you run the desktop it actually has a wizard and I’m going to show you how that wizard works and it’s very easy to get Wireless going so to get the desktop going you need to type in start X all one word st a our T X and that’ll start the Raspberry Pi desktop and here’s the desktop then and you can see over here on the on the left hand side where my cursor is running here if you can see that there a number of icons in future videos I’m going to come back and explain a few of those things but for right now there’s an icon this is Wi-Fi config go ahead and double click on that now remember for this to work you need to have a wireless device that actually is on the the hardware compatibility list so before you go out and buy one check the raspberry pi hardware compatibility pages and make sure that the wireless device that you’ve acquired is on there so here’s the wireless configuration program we don’t have anything going right now there’s no network selected so the first thing we’re going to want to do is scan and that’s going to run out and see if it can find the wireless network and so this is found mine I have a couple of different ones including a guest account I’m going to configure my main account that’s this particular one here yours may come up as something else it may come up as default one or it might come up something like oh I don’t know Cisco wine or some other kind of network name so you should know what your wireless network is at this point I’m going to double click it and that brings up a configuration screen and again let me zoom in a little bit so that you can see this perhaps a little bit better and at the very top it repeats your SSID and you can see mine here the authentication type if you have a typical fairly new home router it’s almost certainly going to be this wpa2 personal if you know that you have a different authentication method then you can pick it here at this drop-down the encryption you probably don’t have to worry about tkip or ccmp probably tkip is going to work for most

of them and so we’re going to go ahead the key in our passphrase this is the phrase that you need to get into the router it’s going to show some dots but it’s not going to show the password and you need to know this and get it typed in right so I’m hoping I type that in right and I’m going to go ahead and click Add this will add this network to the to the database of networks you can go ahead and close this and now you can see that we have arbor Verde is the selected Network I’m going to click connect here and let’s see if we have good luck with a connection associating connection it looks like it found it and as long as we get an IP address which might take another second or two then we’re good to go and we do we have an IP address here this is an IP address on our local local network on this side of my router so that’s really all we need to do let’s check and see if that actually did configure for us and then it actually works so I’ll back out the display again if you go up here to the top left Midori is a browser that comes with them that comes with the Raspberry Pi it’s a kind of a lightweight browser there are others that you can stall but this is the default go ahead and double-click Midori and let’s see if we can get this to load now this isn’t a particularly fast browser that it does work and it does work well with the Raspberry Pi so Midori is loading here so we’ve got the Midori FAQ now this is actually just a file on the local web on the local card there that tells you about Midori from a local file let’s see if we actually have connectivity here so we’ll go to Raspberry Pi org and make sure that loads and if that loads then we know we have the internet connectivity that we want and now we have it we have a web connection to a site on the network so we know everything is up and running that’s pretty much for the initial configuration so again a couple of things you need to configure at that first configuration screen you’re going to want to come into the graphical user interface the with start X to configure Wi-Fi if you need to that’s probably the easiest way to configure Wi-Fi now when you want to shut down remember the raspberry pi doesn’t have an on/off switch you may wish to go ahead and shut down the graphical user interface so we could click logout at this point and that will shut down the graphical user interface we confirm that we want to logout that will bring us back to the prompt here and at the prompt there are some commands you can issue to shut the thing down but at the end of the day you still need to unplug it because there’s no on/off switch so I’m going to pull the PI up here again I’m simply going to unplug it and now we’re done with a demo so thank you very much for watching stay tuned for future videos and I’ll show you actually what you can do with some of those icons and what you can do at the command prompt thanks for watching you

hello and welcome in this video I’m going to show you the initial setup of the Raspberry Pi when you first boot the Raspberry Pi it’s going to run through a setup routine and I’m going to show you what that looks like and I’m also going to demonstrate to you how to configure a wireless a wireless connection let me first show you what I’ve got here here’s the Raspberry Pi let’s see if it there you can see that a little bit better so let me explain what I’ve got going on here first of all this is connected to my computer monitor I’ve got an HDMI to DVI adapter the DVI cable goes to my monitor now keep in mind that if you plug this into an HDMI TV you might be able to just plug that in this one is in fact going to my monitor over here I’ve got a wireless keyboard and mouse now if the wireless keyboard and mouse is on the Raspberry Pi compatibility list this won’t need any configuring it’ll be immediately recognised the wireless connection however this is a little wireless dongle I’ve got plugged in here this will needs some configuration now if you don’t want to go wireless here you could just connect an Internet Ethernet cable cat5 cat5e cat6 and connect that directly to your home router and that would probably start right up I’ve also got the card inserted remember the card has to be prepared I’ve showed you that in a previous video so make sure you’ve prepared the card put the operating system on it now the Raspberry Pi doesn’t have an on/off switch so in order to turn it on all you’re going to do is take your power connection I’m using a cellphone charger here but there are a couple of other options I’ve covered those in previous videos and to turn it on all I’m going to do is plug it in you can see the light start to go perhaps and then in a second you’ll see the you’ll see the screen boot up let me go ahead and kill some of the reflection here so you can see that a little bit better and you can see the Raspberry Pi beginning its boot procedure here and it takes a few seconds and the first time and the first time only you’re going to come to this configuration program now you can come back to this later and run it if you need to change something the first time it loads automatically so let me orient selection here expand route FS that expands the route partition to fill the SD card and let me zoom in a little bit so you can see this perhaps a little bit better it makes it a little bit bigger for you to see so expand the root filesystem when you initially format the card it writes just a little bit of a card with the operating system but you actually want to make the whole card available because you’re going to use that for your storage as well so you want to expand the root filesystem so again arrow up and down you know until that option is as highlighted once that option is highlighted press the tab key then you can press ENTER to select it and you can press the Enter key again to say okay that will bring you back to the configuration screen the other thing you might want to do right now is to make sure that the ssh server is started ssh stands for secure shell this is a means by which you can communicate with the Raspberry Pi remotely so that if it’s on you can actually log in to the Raspberry Pi from a remote computer say another computer or a laptop on your network and to do that you want to make sure that SSH is enabled I’ll cover how that works in a future video but for right now let’s make sure it’s on so get SSH highlighted there press the tab key to select that press ENTER after it’s selected would you like the ssh server enabled or disabled you want to select enable you can toggle back and forth there if it’s not so select an able and press Enter again it will write some stuff out and come back and now the ssh server is enabled and you can press enter to go back to the configuration screen a couple of other things you can do here if you want to do them now you can you can configure overscan that’s a video option that you probably will not need but if it turns out your picture isn’t sized quite right you might need to come back here and change the over skin if you have an alternate keyboard you can come back and set the keyboard you can change the password you can set a locale or timezone you can change the memory

split I probably wouldn’t recommend you do that unless you have a really good reason the Raspberry Pi supports overclocking so if you configure this you can actually make the Raspberry Pi run a little bit faster than it does standard you can configure the desktop to start on boot I’m going to show you the desktop in just a minute and then you can do an update there’s an alternative to doing the update I’m going to show you that so the two things you really want to do for sure the first time you run this or expand the root filesystem enable or disable SSH server and then when you’re done with that press the tab key to select press it again to select finish then go ahead and press Enter it’s going to reboot would you like to reboot now yes answer yes and now we’re going to go through the boot process again again it’ll take a few seconds so we’ll wait till that process finishes rebooting and the autofocus appears to be kicking in but that will stabilize in just a second I’m going to pull back out here so you can see what the screen looks like now we come to a login prompt I’m going to tilt this down to make sure that you can see it and it’s going to want a username about right and note that the password does not echo as you type it so just go ahead and type it and press Enter and if you’ve typed it right with no typos you come to the standard Linux prompt we’re now at the command line and if you are just going to run this as a server you could go ahead and do whatever server like things you wanted to run on it now we do need to configure the wireless that I talked about and so I’m going to show you how to do that it’s possible to do that by configuring various files at the command prompt here but if you run the desktop it actually has a wizard and I’m going to show you how that wizard works and it’s very easy to get Wireless going so to get the desktop going you need to type in start X all one word sta RT X and that’ll start the Raspberry Pi desktop and here’s the desktop then and you can see over here on the on the left hand side where my cursor is running here if you can see that there a number of icons in future videos I’m going to come back and explain a few of those things but for right now there’s an icon this is Wi-Fi config go ahead and double click on that now remember for this to work you need to have a wireless device that actually is on the the hardware compatibility list so before you go out and buy one check the Raspberry Pi configuration program we don’t have anything going right now there’s no network selected so the first thing we’re going to want to do is scan and that’s going to run out and see if it can find the wireless network and so this my main account that’s this particular one here yours may come up as something else it may come up as default one or it might come up something like oh I don’t know Cisco wine or some other kind of when you want to shut down number the Raspberry Pi doesn’t have an on/off switch you may wish to go ahead and shut down the graphical user interface so we could click logout at this point and that will shut down the graphical user interface we confirm that we want to logout that will bring us back to the prompt here and at the prompt there are some commands you can issue to shut the thing down but at the end of the day you still need to unplug it because there’s no on/off switch so I’m going to pull the PI up here again